Don’t Let the Turkeys Get You Down

When faced with challenges, it can be easy to react with anger, bitterness, cynicism, self-righteousness, self-pity—to let these feelings move in and stake their claim in our hearts, for a moment or for years. An antidote for this is Viktor Frankl‘s book Man’s Search for Meaning. I should read at least parts of it often. Frankl spent years in a German concentration camp—talk about challenges, about unfairness, injustice, about not reaping what you have sown. His constant conscious choice to take the high road is humbling. This is someone who epitomized walking his talk.

A friend was walking across the field with me towards the camp when suddenly we came to a field of green crops. Automatically, I avoided it, but he drew his arm through mine and dragged me through it. I stammered something about not treading down the young crops. He became annoyed, gave me an angry look, and shouted… Only slowly could these men be guided back to the commonplace truth that no one has the right to do wrong, not even if wrong has been done to them.

We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way… every day, every hour, offered the opportunity to make a decision, a decision which determined whether you would or would not submit to those powers which threatened to rob you of your very self, your inner freedom; which determined whether or not you would become the plaything of circumstance, renouncing freedom and dignity to become molded into the form of the typical inmate.

Even though conditions such as lack of sleep, insufficient food and various mental stresses may suggest that the inmates were bound to react in certain ways, in the final analysis it becomes clear that the sort of person the prisoner became was the result of an inner decision, and not the result of camp influences alone. Fundamentally, therefore, any man can, even under such circumstances, decide what shall become of him—mentally and spiritually. He may retain his human dignity even in a concentration camp.

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